Culture

Old buildings on steep cliffs, beautiful churches and Moorish palaces reveal the delightful mix of this region’s Muslim and Christian past. Both the large towns and the smaller pueblos blancos have many beautiful sights to offer. And on the local squares the Spanish life bustles around you.

The old quarter of Marbella town is well worth a visit. Small white streets enclose quiet squares, old churches and the walls of a castle dating back to the 9th Century. There are good restaurants scattered everywhere or wander past the many cafes and stop off every now and then to enjoy some tapas.

With the arrival of the Picasso-museum in 2003, Malaga town saw a rise in tourism. Many old buildings in the inner city were renovated and lots of young entrepreneurs opened new shops and restaurants. An exit zone is currently being built in the harbour area. From Malaga you can cycle to the old fishing village Pedregalejo, where you can enjoy freshly caught fish on the beach.

Granada is also within easy reach and ideal for a day trip. Here you will find the most important Moorish estate, the fairytale-like Alhambra, an old Nasrid-palace. Next to the Alhambra is the Albaicin, a Moorish district with a maze of small streets.

A car drive is a great way to spend a day enjoying the natural beauty of this area and the many pueblos blancos, and make sure you stop off  to visit Ronda,  a beautiful town, situated 165 meters above a ravine. Ronda is home to the oldest arena in Spain.

Cordoba, was once the second largest city in the world. The old centre still contains many ancient monuments dating back to the 10th Century. The most famous is the Mezquita, a mosque in which a cathedral was later built. The Juderia surrounds the mosque and offers many restaurants and cafes.

Sevilla, a city with many faces. A beautiful cathedral, the Giralda, the Alcazar and the Tore del Oro, are the most important sights to see in Sevilla. Palaces and churches, parks and squares, alleys and court yards, the sweet smell of jasmine and orange blossom, bull fights and flamenco, vibrant bustle and dreamy silence all combine to give this city a magical atmosphere. And in the evening as encore, saunter one more time through the Barrio Santa Cruz. This is Spain!

Although possible in one day, it’s better to visit Sevilla and Cordoba in a two day round trip. It would be a shame not to experience these cities by night. It’s in the morning and after the siesta that these cities really come to life.

There are many festivals in the various towns, especially in the spring. Every town has its own “Feria”. The Feria of Seville, Jerez are famous, not to mention Semana Santa with the biggest processions in Andalucia.   Andalusia has many traditions, which are still very much alive, even in the smaller pueblos.